June 24, 2017 until August 13, 2017
All Day


“Little Boshkung (‘lake of many echoes’)

Video and Installation by Andrew Lennox

After losing his brother and mother, a boy reconstructs their home movies into a mapped landscape of their homeland, as a means of recreating the path of their fateful voyage.

 

“Little Boshkung” is an experiment with the “emulsion lift” technique.  Regular 8mm home movies from the 1950’s were enlarged onto 35mm and 105mm film, boiled in water to separate the emulsion and re-adhered to a new substrate to form a series of mosaic collages.  This water-based technique illustrates the story of a boy drowning in a lake and explores themes of memory/recollection and grief experienced by his family.

The concept behind the project is to demonstrate a connection between the process of memory and the materiality of film.  The gelatin-based material of the emulsion bears a physical affinity to human tissue and the film frame lines are networked into a structure of cells with ribbons of 8mm film threaded between image clusters, like veins through a nervous system.  These frame lines function both as registers of information and conduits between the pathology of connecting information.  Collectively these cells were arranged to produce a mosaic collage of images.   This collage is meant to represent a network of memories or a “mental geography” (i.e. a visualization of images in the mind as if it were designed like a map).  In the movie portion of the exhibit, characters from the original footage navigate a path through this mindscape (as if it were a landscape) to produce a montage that forms the narrative of the memory/story.  This path is meant to symbolize the process of recollection within the mind’s eye.  The camera re-photographs the objects as an analogy for the process within the mind’s eye of recounting and re-organizing information to re-form the memory of an event (i.e. the process of recollection).

Essentially, this installation functions as a visualization of memories contained within the mind and the process of recollecting these memories to re-formulate and make meaning of past experiences.

Acknowledgements: 

Canada Council for The Arts 

Ontario Arts Council